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Famous Qoutes

    Table of contents
    1. 1. Quotes
    2. 2. By Hamlet (Act III, Scene 1) To be, or not to be: that is the question: Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, Or to take arms against a sea of troubles, And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep; No more; and by a sleep to say we end The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation Devoutly to be wish'd. To die, to sleep; To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub; For in that sleep of death what dreams may come When we have shuffled off this mortal coil, Must give us pause: there's the respect That makes calamity of so long life; For who would bear the whips and scorns of time, The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely, The pangs of despised love, the law's delay, The insolence of office and the spurns That patient merit of the unworthy takes, When he himself might his quietus make With a bare bodkin? who would fardels bear, To grunt and sweat under a weary life, But that the dread of something after death, The undiscover'd country from whose bourn No traveller returns, puzzles the will And makes us rather bear those ills we have Than fly to others that we know not of? Thus conscience does make cowards of us all; And thus the native hue of resolution Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought, And enterprises of great pith and moment With this regard their currents turn awry, And lose the name of action.--Soft you now! The fair Ophelia! Nymph, in thy orisons Be all my sins remember'd. Summary: Hamlet expressed his feelings to the audience in this soliloquy. He faced the problem of wondering whether it is better to live than to die. He states his feelings about life after death and if life is worth the nonsense that one has to put up with. Hamlet comes to the conclusion that the mind is too strong and there isn’t anyone with enough courage to commit suicide.   by Claudius (Act IV, Scene 3) I have sent to seek him, and to find the body. How dangerous is it that this man goes loose! Yet must not we put the strong law on him: He's loved of the distracted multitude, Who like not in their judgment, but their eyes; And where tis so, the offender's scourge is weigh'd, But never the offence. To bear all smooth and even, This sudden sending him away must seem Deliberate pause: diseases desperate grown By desperate appliance are relieved, Or not at all. Summary: After Claudius finds out that Hamlet has killed Polonius, he sends for Hamlet and wants to know where Polonius’ body rests. This quote explains how Claudius makes the decision to send hamlet to England as soon as possible because this is the only way that he may be cured.   by Hamlet (Act IV, Scene 3) Not where he eats, but where he is eaten: a certain convocation of politic worms are e'en at him. Your worm is your only emperor for diet: we fat all creatures else to fat us, and we fat ourselves for maggots: your fat king and your lean beggar is but variable service, two dishes, but to one table: that's the end. Summary: Hamlet is talking to Claudius after he was retrieved by Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. Hamlet had just killed Polonius and he would not give Claudius a straight answer to where he put the dead body. More Quotes

    Quotes

     

    1.)"When sorrows come, they come not single spies, but in battalions." by Claudius (Act IV, Scene 5)

     Summary: Claudius says this because of everything that happened to Polonius. He is telling Ophelia that when bad things happen they all happen at once. He references “single spies, but in battalions” to enemy spies from an army cause they all come at once. 

     

     

     

     

     

    2.) “The body is with the king, but the king is not with the body. The king is a thing.” by Hamlet (Act IV, Scene 2) 

    Summary: After knowing of Polonius’s death Claudius sends Rosencrantz and Guildenstern to fetch Hamlet, do to the fact that he has Polonius’s body. When the friends go and find Hamlet he says that “the body’s with the king but the king is not with the body”. What Hamlet is implying is that he hid Polonius’s body in the kings castle but King Claudius does not know where the body is. So the body is with the king in the castle but the king is not physically with the body. 

     

     

    3.)"I will speak daggers to her, but use none." by Hamlet (Act III, Scene 2)

    Summary: This Quote is made by Hamlet in Act III. This is after the play; Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are called by Gertrude to go a fetch Hamlet. Hamlet tells his friends that he will “speak daggers to her, but use none”. In this quote Hamlet just means that he will yell and scream and tell his mother what is going on, but will not hurt her in anyway.

     

     

     

    By Hamlet (Act III, Scene 1)
    To be, or not to be: that is the question:
    Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
    The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
    Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
    And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;
    No more; and by a sleep to say we end
    The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
    That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation
    Devoutly to be wish'd. To die, to sleep;
    To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub;
    For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
    When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
    Must give us pause: there's the respect
    That makes calamity of so long life;
    For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
    The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely,
    The pangs of despised love, the law's delay,
    The insolence of office and the spurns
    That patient merit of the unworthy takes,
    When he himself might his quietus make
    With a bare bodkin? who would fardels bear,
    To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
    But that the dread of something after death,
    The undiscover'd country from whose bourn
    No traveller returns, puzzles the will
    And makes us rather bear those ills we have
    Than fly to others that we know not of?
    Thus conscience does make cowards of us all;
    And thus the native hue of resolution
    Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought,
    And enterprises of great pith and moment
    With this regard their currents turn awry,
    And lose the name of action.--Soft you now!
    The fair Ophelia! Nymph, in thy orisons
    Be all my sins remember'd.
    Summary: Hamlet expressed his feelings to the audience in this soliloquy. He faced the problem of wondering whether it is better to live than to die. He states his feelings about life after death and if life is worth the nonsense that one has to put up with. Hamlet comes to the conclusion that the mind is too strong and there isn’t anyone with enough courage to commit suicide.
     
    by Claudius (Act IV, Scene 3)
    Summary: After Claudius finds out that Hamlet has killed Polonius, he sends for Hamlet and wants to know where Polonius’ body rests. This quote explains how Claudius makes the decision to send hamlet to England as soon as possible because this is the only way that he may be cured.
     
    by Hamlet (Act IV, Scene 3)
    Summary: Hamlet is talking to Claudius after he was retrieved by Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. Hamlet had just killed Polonius and he would not give Claudius a straight answer to where he put the dead body.
    More Quotes

     

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